Posts Tagged ‘Bahamas’

Want to fish for the New England Aquarium?

September 11, 2008

“Where they Went” by Diane Daniel
(Published Aug. 31, 2008, in the Boston Globe)

I’d never stopped to think where aquariums get their stock until I heard about these “collecting” trips. What a cool idea to invite paying guests!

Russ Haims on a boat deck before diving in Bimini

Russ Haims on a boat deck before diving in Bimini

WHO: Russ Haims, 46, of Wayland, Mass.

WHERE: Bahamas.

WHEN: 10 days in May.

WHY: To volunteer on his fourth “Collecting Trip” conducted by the New England Aquarium. Haims returns because, “I love marine life, I’m an avid scuba diver, and the thought of helping out the aquarium and then taking my young children there and saying, look at what Daddy caught, what more could I want?”

GO FISH: “There are three crew, three aquarium staff members, and nine participants. Our job is to collect fish and marine life for the aquarium. Of course they’re very conscientious about handling the fish and protecting the reef,” Haims said. Usually the volunteers are hobbyists from around the country. But, aside from a Dutch couple, this outing comprised several aquarium staff members, including president and CEO Howard “Bud” Ris and his wife, Margaret. (Another Collecting Trip leaves Sept. 14, at a cost of about $3,500, excluding airfare.)

Russ (left) gathers fish with Joe Brennan of Boston (center) and boat captain, Lou Rich of Miami (Click to ENLARGE)

Russ (left) gathers fish with Joe Brennan of Boston (center) and boat captain, Lou Rich of Miami (Click to ENLARGE)

SITES AND FINDS: “The trips originate from Miami, and we always go through Bimini, but the itinerary changes depending on what dive sites we go to,” Haims said. “We’re on a research vessel, a 25-year- old dive boat.” The volunteers would dive three or four times daily for 45-minute intervals. On this trip they netted about 400 specimens for the aquarium. They also conduct scientific surveys of the reef life.

Russ during his diving trip to Bimini (Click to ENLARGE)

Russ spent several hours a day underwater. (Click to ENLARGE)

WISH LIST: “The New England Aquarium has a very detailed wish list of species, quantity, and sometimes gender. This time, for example, they wanted a yellow stingray of a certain size, but not a female so you don’t take babies.” They caught several, which are now part of the new touch-tank exhibit. “Before every dive we have what’s called a chalk talk where they explain where the boat is, what reefs are around it, what fish you might find, whether there’s a current, and they demonstrate on the boat how to catch the fish.”

Russ diving at Bond Cay in the Berry Islands outside of Bimini (Click to ENLARGE)

Russ diving at Bond Cay in the Berry Islands outside of Bimini

NET GAINS: The divers use several methods of catching fish, usually a net handled by two people or the whole group. “Every time you identify and capture them you put them in your catch bag. Then you bring them on board and see them alive. It’s very rewarding.” The fish are brought up slowly in order to acclimate and some even go into a decompression chamber. On “pack day,” the group awakens at 2 a.m. to painstakingly prepare the fish for the airplane ride home. “If people knew how much care goes into all the fish at the aquarium, they’d have such an appreciation for them.”

ON PURPOSE: Of the aquarium trips, Haims said, “I cannot imagine a more rewarding, purposeful, and enjoyable activity. I’m not interesting in diving to see something that’s just pretty anymore.”

Yoga? Sure. But where’s my coffee?

July 25, 2008

“Where they Went” by Diane Daniel
(Published June 22, 2008, in the Boston Globe)

From Di’s Eyes: I’m with you, Janet. Pass the coffee and don’t expect me to show up at for 6 a.m. chanting. I’d love the yoga and writing parts, though!

WHO: Janet Spurr, 52, of Marblehead, Mass.

WHERE: Bahamas.

WHEN: One week in January.

WHY: “I had had a death in my family, and I really wanted to get away on a retreat, something with yoga and writing, on the water. I’d done writing retreats and yoga, but never together.”

Janet Spurr (left) and workshop teacher Virginia Frances Schwartz (Click to ENLARGE)

Janet Spurr (left) and workshop teacher Virginia Frances Schwartz (Click to ENLARGE)

BACK TO BASICS: Online, Spurr found Sivananda Ashram Yoga Retreat on Paradise Island, Nassau, which included yoga, meditation, and a writing workshop with young-adult novelist Virginia Frances Schwartz. Based on other writing retreats she had attended, Spurr expected cushy accommodations. “I guess I didn’t do enough research,” she said. “It was very minimal. There was no coffee, but I brought my own, which people joked about.”

DON’T DO MORNINGS: The rooms were simple, with bunk beds and bookcases, though she was able to reserve a single room. Bathrooms were dormitory style. “The bells started ringing at 5:30 a.m., and then at 6 there was chanting and meditation. You were expected to go, but I only went once. I did go to the evening meditation four nights out of six,” she noted. “The food was all vegetarian, and it was good. But for dinner there was only tea and you had to bring your own water.”

A NEW PLACE: The two daily yoga classes took Spurr’s practice “to a whole new level. I’ve been doing yoga on and off for two years, and this was very challenging and really excellent. You do quite a bit of stretching and a lot of relaxation, and they really concentrate on positions. This one monk brought me to a higher level of understanding yoga and helped heal my heart after the death of my aunt. It was like physical therapy for my heart. The best part was it was outside on platforms at the beach.”

Janet (left) and Virginia hugging

Janet (left) and Virginia hugging

SOME MIND BENDING: The three-hour daily workshop, called “Writing from the Spirit: Yoga and the Art of Creative Writing,” combined writing and yoga moves. “We learned to do basic yoga poses to open your creative energies more to writing. It definitely opened me up, and was the best writing workshop I’ve taken,” said Spurr, who recently self-published a collection of essays called “Beach Chair Diaries.”

Cheeseburger

Cheeseburger

BURGER IN PARADISE: Spurr likened the week to “college at the beach without alcohol. I met some great people. There were no computers, no phone, no cellphone service, no TV.” Still, there was one thing she didn’t want to give up. “I needed a hamburger,” she said. So she walked 20 minutes down the beach to Atlantis, a huge resort and casino where people were drinking, smoking, and gambling. “It was so strange to see that,” she said. “I ordered a bacon cheeseburger, because one meat wasn’t enough.”